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UPCOMING WEBINAR

An IC Check-Up

patient safety webinarPlease register for Strategies to Manage Hospital Acquired Conditions Reporting in an ACA World - An IC Check-Up on Sept 9th, 2014 1:00 PM CDT at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5973501898406116610

With the August 1 Final Rule announcement by CMS, it’s time we had an Infection Control check-up from our IC expert, Brian Foy.

Brian will explain recent changes to Federal rules and its impacts on everyday IC preventionists. Then, the team will outline some of the experienced and expected challenges faced by industry partners and their solutions.

More information on Strategies to Manage Hospital Acquired Conditions Reporting in an ACA World - An IC Check-Up...

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FEATURED WHITE PAPER

Is the Answer to Enhanced Patient Safety Hiding in Plain Sight?
The Transformation of “Incident Reporting

Is the Answer to Enhanced Patient Safety Hiding in Plain Sight? The Transformation of “Incident ReportingWe all have these systems, whether paper or electronic, that are supposed to capture incidents that can lead to and/or have resulted in patient harm. Most of these systems can do this, but many will agree that there is something missing – something important – when it comes to whether or not these systems actually enhance patient safety.

We cannot just track incidents anymore; we need to make this an organization-wide process where we build awareness, which leads to intervention, and results in changes that can be seen and monitored. In this white paper, we discuss the transformation of traditional “incident reporting” into an integrated patient safety management system and offer a path to achieve this transformation.


Click here to download a free PDF.

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Christiana Care Health System's health care workers are participating in a major study to determine if wearing gowns and gloves for all patient care in one unit will reduce health care-acquired infections. Christiana Care is one of only 20 academic medical centers nationwide participating in the Benefits of Universal Gown and Gloving, a $5.7 million study supported by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Joint Commission.

Christiana Care Health System's health care workers are participating in a major study to determine if wearing gowns and gloves for all patient care in one unit will reduce health care-acquired infections.

Christiana Care is one of only 20 academic medical centers nationwide participating in the Benefits of Universal Gown and Gloving, a $5.7 million study supported by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Joint Commission.

The study is comparing 10 hospital intensive care units that use gowns and gloves for all patients against 10 hospitals using current CDC guidelines for prevention of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and VRE (vancomycin-resistant enterococci). The CDC currently recommends gloves and gowns whenever health care workers come into contact with patients who already have been diagnosed with MRSA or VRE infections.

Christiana Hospital's Surgical Critical Care Complex has been selected as one of the 10 intensive care units in which gloves and gowns must be worn by all health care workers and visitors whenever they enter a patient's room. The intervention began in January and will end in September.

"What we're trying to do through this study is find a definitive answer – universal gown and gloving may become the new standard of care, or might have no benefit or might even cause harm," said Marci Drees, M.D., hospital epidemiologist and medical director of infection prevention at Christiana Care. "We are honored to be included in such a prestigious study."

Participation in the study requires a coordinated team approach that touches several components of the hospital, including nursing and medical staff, quality and safety, purchasing, materials management, environmental services and infection prevention.

"Our teams have come together in a coordinated fashion to help make this study a success," Dr. Drees said.

Dr. Drees believes the findings from the study will result in improvements in the U.S. health care system. An estimated one out of every 20 hospitalized patients will contract a hospital-acquired infection, according to the CDC. The CDC estimates that the overall annual direct medical costs due to hospital-acquired infections can be as high as $45 billion.

For more information about Christiana Care, visit www.christianacare.org/whoweare.

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ABQAURP American Society for Quality American Society for Quality Healthcare Division Consumers Advancing Patient Safety
EMPSF Institute for Safe Medical Practices
           
Medically Induced Trauma Support Services (MITSS) Medication Safety Officers Society NPSF Partnership for Patient Safety Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine